Figure 1. Population-Weighted Distributions of Judgmental Well-being (2016) among OBOR countries

The various panels of Figure 1 contain bar charts showing for the world as a whole, and for developing and developed countries, and 4 global regions that OBOR countries belong to, the distribution of the 2016 answers to the Cantril ladder question asking respondents to value and judge their lives today on a 0 to 10 scale, with the worst possible life as a 0 and the best possible life as a 10.

From the plots, we can see there is a varying difference in distribution of judgmental happiness among different regions and different economic development status.

Figure 2. Population-Weighted Distributions of Emotional Well-being (2016) among OBOR countries

The various panels of Figure 2 incorporate histograms showing for the world as a whole, and for developing and developed countries, and 4 global regions which OBOR countries belong to, the distribution of the 2016 answers to the question asking respondents their living experience (positive and negative) on a 0 to 1 scale, and the final score takes the difference of positive and negative experience.

From the plots, we can see the distribution of emotional happiness among different regions and different economic development status.

Figure 3. Population-Weighted Distributions of Well-being Inequality (2016) among OBOR countries

The various panels of Figure 3 incorporate histograms showing for the world as a whole, and for developing and developed countries, and 4 global regions which OBOR countries belong to, the distribution of the 2016 well-being inequality, which is the standard deviation of judgmental well-being score.

We can see, from the graphs, that the distribution of well-being inequality is not equally distributed among different regions and countries with different economic development status.